1 Reply
      Latest reply on Jun 29, 2019 8:14 AM by KMT
      rsood@snowbladesoftware Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

        Hello,

         

        I am new to iOS development, and I am building an app for iPhone.  I want to support as many different versions of the iPhone as possible.

         

        In the latest version of Xcode (or at least what I think is the latest version), there are simulators for iPhone XS Max, XS, XR, X, SE, 8 Plus, 8, 7 Plus, 7, 6S Plus, 6S, 6 Plus, 6, and 5S.  On the other hand, in interface builder, there is the ability to view as device XS Max, XS, XR, SE, 8 Plus, 8, or 4S (7 & 7 Plus, as well as 6 <whatever> are missing; there is also a 4S instead of 5S - not sure if this is just a typo in Xcode, as 4S iPhones are no longer updateable, or if there is some reason they have included the ability to build interfaces for 4S but not 5S).

         

        A couple questions:

         

        Why do some of the devices that have simulators not have views in interface builder - are they redudant? 

         

        If my app looks good in all the device views and runs correctly on all the simulators, which actual devices can I be reasonably certain it will work on?

         

        Thanks for your time.

        • Re: Default iPhone simulators vs. Default Interface Builder Device views - which devices can I support?
          KMT Level 9 Level 9 (14,875 points)

               >are they redudant?

           

          Yes.  As an example, the 9.7" iPP is the same as the iPad Air.

           

               >If my app looks good in all the device views and runs correctly on all the simulators, which actual devices can I be reasonably certain it will work on?

           

          Unknown without real world confirmation, but most, on a good day, I think. Keep in mind the simulator is not an emulator and it's screen is your computer display.

           

          Simulators are meant to evaluate your UI's logical flow more than anything.

           

          That said, and since it is not reasonable for every dev to own each device, it becomes a leap of faith, and something that is learned over time whether or not one's layouts perform as hoped in the real world. The more app's you put in the store, the more you'll get a feel for the nuances of how your layouts etc. work on various screens.

           

          App Review will have an opinion as well, but don't treat that process as a testing service. Speaking of which, don't ignore that TestFlight can bring more devices into play if you want to cover that base. And of course your users will let you know if they're not happy about how it looks as well.

           

           

               >4S - not sure if this is just a typo

           

          iPhone apps can be run in 1x/2x emulation mode on iPad...that scheme replicates a 4S screen.